Deck Stain Reviews Ratings
Deck Stain Help Articles
Deck Stain Reviews Ratings

Posts Tagged ‘oil based deck stains’

Hardwood Deck Staining

We have been getting great feedback here at from all of the consumers who have been looking for better stain alternatives for their deck restoration. Our most popular article, “What is the Best Deck Stain” has quickly become the number one article on the web for asking questions and getting answers on restoring your exterior wood and deck.

In this article we are going to cover what actually is a “Deck Stain”. We will compare the many different types of decking stain options available and what are the positives and negatives of each.

Deck Stains

Deck stains are used to protect and preserve your exterior wood. They offer UV protection, water repellency, mold and mildew resistance, etc. Deck coatings come in many different types of opacity and bases. Many deck stain brands can be restricted in certain states, cities and counties due the VOC laws.

Deck staining can be a “chore” for residential homeowners and unfortunately walking into your local store may produce some of the worst options available. Not all deck stains are created equal and there is not a perfect stain type or brand that will out perform all the others.

Water-Based Deck Stains

Water based deck stain have come on rapidly in the last 4 years. The main reason for the vast amount of water based stains on the market today is related to changes in VOC laws across the country. Many states have adopted or soon will adopt lower VOC (Volatile Organic Compounds) regulations. This has prompted stain manufacturers to increase production of water soluble decking stains. In our opinion, water-based deck stain are “thin” paints with varying amount of acrylic and pigment.

Pros: Water cleanup, less chance of mold or mildew growth. Environmentally friendly.

Cons: Do not penetrate like an oil-base can. Slightly harder to apply as they dry quicker. Can be prone to peeling and wearing. *Defy Stains are the only exception that we have tested. They penetrate the best of all water based stains, nearly as well as an oil.

Oil based Deck Stains

Oil based decking stains have been around for 20-30 years and have been traditionally what all stain manufacturers produce. Oil based stains are typically made up of natural and synthetic oils. Many contain oils such as: Linseed Oil, Paraffin Oil, Tung Oil, Rosewood Oil, Etc.

Pros: Excellent penetration into wood. The better a deck stain can penetrate, the better the performance. Easier to apply. More natural looking.

Cons: Stronger odors, longer drying and curing time. Some oils can promote the growth of mildew. Some oil-based stains will darken in color over time.

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TWP 1500 Review
TWP 1500 Series Deck Stain Review

TWP 1500 Review

TWP 1500 Stain RatingsImportant Note: This is our 2nd Review of TWP 1500 Series. Our first review of the TWP 1500 Stain was started in 2010 and completed in 2012.

See Here for First Review: TWP 1500 Series Review

TWP 1500 Series Preservative is an  Oil-Based EPA approved wood enhancing preservative that stops structural damage and exterior wood rot on treated or previously treated above ground wood surfaces such as fencing, decking, roof shakes, wood siding and log homes.

*Note: TWP 1500 and the TWP 100 are the only deck stains registered by the EPA as a wood preservative. The 1500 is compliant in all US states while the 100 Series is not.

TWP Deck Stains – 1500 Series Review

TWP 1500 Stain Deck Stain Scores (1-10)

Appearance After Initial Stain Application: 8.5

For the pine deck we used the TWP 1530 Natural. This is not a “clear” but rather a traditional cedar color in our opinion. The manufacturer stated they made this color in the 1500 Series to match the color of the TWP 101 Cedartone. This allows for an easy switch from the 100 Series for consumers who are in a low voc state.

The wood grain was highlighted naturally with the 1530 Natural semi-transparent tint. The 1500 does not mask or film on top of the wood grain.

Preventing UV Graying at 2 Year Mark: 8.5

Excellent at preventing UV graying at the two year mark.  For the vertical railings, the TWP 1500 lost very little of the color. For the horizontals, we saw close to 80% color retention.

Same results as last time and one of the better products for preventing color fading

Wear/Tear and Peeling: 8

The TWP 1500 penetrates deep into the wood reducing the chance of wearing. We find that the 1500 Scored well here for a low VOC oil based stain.

Note that when staining brand new wood with TWP, we have found that it is best to let the wood season in the elements for at least 3+ months. Once it is weathered, we prep with a deck cleaner and wood brightener to enhance the stain penetration. Only 1 coat of the TWP 1500 for new smooth wood.

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Flood CWF Oil Review
Flood CWF Oil Review

Flood CWF Oil Review

Important Note:  This is our 2nd review for Flood CWF UV5. See our first review here: Flood CWF5 Oil Review

  • Premium oil finish ideal for newer, less weathered wood
  • Adds minimal color and highlights the natural wood grain
  • Penetrating formula protects against moisture damage
  • Mildew-resistant finish won’t crack, peel or flake
  • Clear Tint Base can be custom-matched to most wood tones while maintaining the wood’s natural look
  • Apply quickly with a pump or airless sprayer, or brush or roll on
  • Features Penetrol®, which penetrates and protects wood from the inside out, ensuring long-lasting performance

Flood CWF5 Oil Stain Scores (1-10)

Appearance After Initial Stain Application: 8

– The Flood CWF-UV5 had a nice rich color when applied to the ACQ Pine decking. Golden with a hint of orange color. Knots were a little lighter in color than the rest of the deck but, that is normal for a true oil based stain. Grain was highlighted well.

Preventing UV Graying at 2 Year Mark: 7

– Color retention was decent. Flooring lost about 30% color, but railings retained much of the original color.

Wear/Tear and Peeling: 7

– No peeling, but there was wearing around the high traffic areas.

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How to Change From Water Based to Oil Based Exterior Decking Stain and Vice Versa

The longevity of a deck or other exterior wood structure depends highly on how well it is maintained. A wood surface left alone or neglected will not last long in the harsh environment. Wood needs to be sealed and protected from moisture, UV rays, mold, mildew and such contaminants that will cause rot and decay. The most common types of wood protectants are oil and water based.

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*This is first and foremost a help site from our experience as wood restoration contractors. All stain and prepping manufacturer directions were followed with our reviews and ratings. We offer no guarantee of similar results. Take inconsideration that wood and deck stain results may differ due to prepping procedures, different wood types, exposure to UV radiation, natural weathering, etc.