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Posts Tagged ‘Stain New Pressure Treated Pine’

New Smooth Wood
Staining a New Deck

New Smooth Wood

Over the past year we have numerous questions asked on the site, but none was asked more than “What stain or prep is needed for my new deck”? There seems to be an opinion among homeowners that is is okay to stain new wood right away or even before the deck is installed. This is incorrect for most wood types and stain brands.

In this article we will cover the required prep and waiting period needed before applying a stain for the first time.

New Smooth Decking

New smooth decking boards are not porous enough for most stains to be able to penetrate properly. This is mainly due to:

  • Mill glaze when cut
  • High moisture content
  • Chemicals in Pressure Treated Wood

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Pressure Treated Pine
Staining a New Deck

Pressure Treated Pine

See here for a more in-depth article on Staining New Decking.

Staining a new deck in 2016 has never been easier. With today’s quality wood cleaners and stains most anyone can get professional like results. We have come a long way in wood restoration products and in 2016 most of these products are available to do it yourself homeowners everywhere. With the Internet, most of these products can be shipped directly to your home within days, making a deck staining project easier than ever before.

In addition to excellence deck staining products, the Internet also allows homeowners access to countless how to articles and tips to help them along the way. Doing a search for deck stain help can lead you to a mountain of information that will educate and prepare you for your deck staining project. From prepping the deck, suggested dry times, stain recommendations, and right down to how to apply the stain there has never been a more opportune time.

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New Cedar Wood
New Cedar Wood

New Cedar Wood

When a deck is brand new usually the lumber is still very “green” and has a high moisture content. That is unless the lumber is KDAT lumber meaning, “kiln dried after treatment.” This type of wood is dried before it is sold. But for the average deck being built, regular cedar, redwood, or pine is used in the construction. You may have heard the term “season” and how it is important to let a new deck season prior to staining it.

To season a deck simply means to let it sit, for a season, before you attempt to stain it. This is because the wood still has too much moisture in it and staining it can trap that unwanted moisture. This can lead to many moisture problems like mold, fungi, rot, and decay. This term can be a bit misleading though. Normally a deck does not have to “season” a whole year. Many times, depending on weather and sun exposure, a deck can season much quicker. In most cases a new deck can be stained within 3-12 months of being built especially if the weather has been warm and the deck gets a lot of sun exposure.

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STAINadvicetipsROLLOVER

Deck Staining and Sealing Instructions and How To Tips for Best Results

The instructions for staining and sealing a deck will vary from product to product. It’s always best to follow the manufacturers suggested application instructions for the best results. There are however some basic tips and techniques that will aid in staining and sealing with any deck protection product.

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Pressure Treated Pine
Pressure Treated Pine

Pressure Treated Pine

Whether you have had an old deck replaced or simply had a new deck added on, there are certainly a lot of benefits. Wood decks increase a home’s curb appeal and value. They add extra outdoor living space and are the witness of many to come family gatherings and get-togethers. A new deck’s strength and sheer durability makes you feel like it will last forever. But as some homeowners soon find out, that newness can wear off and that once beautiful deck becomes a neglected eyesore.

But there is hope and to keep your new deck looking new and lasting for many years to come, you merely have to take care of it. Weather and elements like moisture and fading UV rays are a new deck’s biggest enemy. So the goal in keeping a deck looking good is to provide it with some protection.

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TimberOil Brand Stain - For New Decks

TimberOil Brand Stain - For New Decks

Not to be confused with Cabot Australian Timber Oil

Timber Oil Brand is a deep penetrating paraffin oil-based wood and deck stain. This stain dives deep into all exterior wood to condition the wood cells while preventing UV fading and water damage.

TimberOil Brand is strongly suggested by the manufacturer for all new wood. Many wood and deck stains have difficulty with penetrating new exterior wood such as cedar, redwood, and especially pressure treated pine. Timber Oil Brand promises ease of application and proper penetration into new decking.

Note: We tested the TimberOil Brand on a new cedar deck three weeks after installation. Only prepping was a light cleaning to remove the dirt.

TimberOil Brand Stain Scores (1-10)

Appearance After Initial Stain Application: 8

– The Timber Oil Brand looked even on our new cedar test deck. No overlapping or issues were apparent. The Honey Gold color was a rich “wet look”. The railings did not have any drips or runs. Penetration into the wood was 100% with no surface film or oily residue.

Preventing UV Graying at 2 Year Mark: 5

– About 50% of the original color was left after 2 years. Wood looked more “natural”.

Wear/Tear and Peeling: 8

– Timber Oil Brand had a slight amount of wearing on the railings otherwise there was no issues.

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*This is first and foremost a help site from our experience as wood restoration contractors. All stain and prepping manufacturer directions were followed with our reviews and ratings. We offer no guarantee of similar results. Take inconsideration that wood and deck stain results may differ due to prepping procedures, different wood types, exposure to UV radiation, natural weathering, etc.

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