Best Stain for New Pine Deck  4.7/5 (16)

This post was updated on May 1, 2024

The Best Stain for New Pine Decks

Since we first published this article, some new stains have been introduced. We recommend you browse our site with honest reviews for recommendations for the best stain for a new pine deck when it comes to prep and stain application. We always appreciate your input, so feel free to leave a comment below with pictures of your pine deck stain projects.

My Best New Wood Deck Stain

Water-Based

My Best Applying New

Wood Deck Stain 

My Best New Wood Deck Stain

Oil-Based 

Months to Weather New Wood:

3 months for both semi-transparent and solid stain colors.

Months to Weather New Wood:

2-3 months for transparent and semi-transparent colors. 12 months for semi-solid.

Months to Weather New Wood: 

4 - 12 months for all TWP Series and Colors.


Need Help Finding the Best Stain for New Pine Deck?

The best time to stain a deck is after it is built while the wood is still new and has not been compromised by weather damage. However, it is important to allow a new pine deck to dry out for several months before staining it. A new pine deck contains too much moisture at first and you do not want to trap that moisture in the wood by staining it too soon. Wait for the wood to reach 12% moisture level or less. This can be checked with a moisture meter. As mentioned this usually takes a few months of warm weather depending on the sun exposure the deck receives. Do not wait too long though like a year or more because that is when most of the damage occurs to unprotected pine.

Choosing the best stain for a new pine deck is the key to a beautiful long-lasting finish. Because newer wood will be denser than older wood, it will not absorb stain as well. Therefore you want to choose a deck stain that has exceptional penetrating traits. Both Armstrong Clark and Timber Oil make a stain that works well on new pine decks. Many brands of stain fail to penetrate new pine because of the denseness but both of these brands promise proper penetration into new pine decking as well as other types of new wood like cedar and redwood.

The best stain for new pine decks like the ones mentioned above will also help condition the wood. This helps keep the cellular structure of the wood in good shape to prevent warping, cracking, and splintering. The special blend of these stains is designed specifically for newer type of wood. This will ensure your new pine deck is well protected from the beginning to prevent future costly repairs. Nothing is more important to protect your new investment than choosing the best stain.

Staining a New Deck Tips Video – DeckStainHelp.com

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author avatar
Scott Paul ~ Restoring Wood & Decks Since 1993 Owner
As an article and comment contributor to the site, Scott has been around the pressure washing industry since attending college. In 1993 he started his first company called Oakland Pressure Wash specializing in exterior pressure washing and deck staining. That company evolved into OPW L.L.C. shortly thereafter concentrating more on exterior wood and deck restoration. Scott and his Deck Cleaning Michigan company have restored over 10,000 decks in the Metro Detroit area since the early years. He has become an authority in the deck restoration industry and has contributed to numerous wood restoration forums and informative sites. All the products he suggests through this site are sold through online sites and in retail stores, allowing the consumer to choose their own means of purchase. Scott’s eCommerce sites do sell many top brands he endorses and if you appreciate any of the help he has offered then feel free to purchase from one of them.

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Mary Di.
Mary Di.
22 days ago

Hi – I’m in the process of removing all the old Penofin (oil based) stain from my pine deck in Southern CA. It was long overdue and had become black with dirt and wear. Please recommend a water based stain for my climate (hot summers with possible heavy or no rain winters) that I won’t have to clean/reapply yearly. Thank you.

Ken
Ken
1 year ago

We want to stain our newly built pine wood deck and wondering which Armstrong Clark stain we should use. Based on the compromise between the UV protection and lighter color, we think the semi-transparent Cedar will be a good option. I understand that we need to reapply every 1-2 years. Will the color become darker as we keep applying the same color? If so, should we choose a transparent natural tone and reapply it every year? Or is there way to remove the stain before the reapplication?

Ken
Ken
1 year ago

Thank you for your quick reply. This is very helpful. Do these stains have a shelf life? Since you recommend reapplication in 12-18 months, does it make sense to buy enough for two applications?

Sue Fraser
Sue Fraser
3 years ago

What if you need to wait until winter is over. Our deck is being finished in October. What month is soon enough to stain?

Mrs. Herr
Mrs. Herr
4 years ago

Another question is what is the best stain to use on fresh cut pine? Should the stain have and oil base in it . Any particular oil. I do have linseed oil.

Mrs. Herr
Mrs. Herr
4 years ago

Built a small cabin out of fresh cut pine from the sawmill.How long should I wait to stain the wood. This cabin does not see much daylight and is under the tree’s.

Vay
Vay
5 years ago

Thank you for your great advice! For new pine decks, which type of stain do you recommend? Ie. transparent, semi transparent, or solid. Do they change the longevity of the stain? I’m looking for something that’s more less maintenance but also less damaging. Thank you so much!

Kathleen Sabol
Kathleen Sabol
5 years ago

Just finished building a combination of 3 platforms and 34 steps out of 2”-#1 pine in western PA. About 50% is in the shade and the rest mostly sunny. My question besides the best type of stain is do I wait until spring or begin staining now. Thank you.

Waddell Bobby
Waddell Bobby
5 years ago

Can one use a Cabot oil stain with color after applying natural Cabot timer oil a one year ago on treated pine (KDAT)

Bob
Bob
5 years ago

I was told that if I use a behr cleaning solution I could stain my deck right away. It was just built 3 weeks ago. Please advise

Louis Schmier
Louis Schmier
5 years ago

I’ve just built a large deck using new pressure treated pine (450 sqft). The amount of time rec. by stain companies before staining is all over the map from 1-12 months. I am here in the hot, muggy, and buggy weather of South Georgia that is constantly pushing the high 90s with a heat factor of over 100. The deck is both in partial shade and sun. How long should I reasonably wait before staining? By the way, thank you for your great and informative sight.

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