Remove Deck Stain When Reapplying?  5/5 (2)

This post was updated on February 28, 2024

Remove Old Deck Stain for Reapplication

Not all deck stain types and brands of deck stains are compatible with each other. Below are some tips when switching your brand of deck stain or type of deck stain and how to prep for maximum results when reapplying a deck stain to your wood if you have used a different stain prior.

Changing Brands of Deck Stain for Reapplication

If you are switching brands of transparent, semi-transparent, or semi-solid deck stains you will need to strip and or sand to remove the prior deck stain coatings. It does not matter if you are applying an oil-based stain over an old oil-based deck stain, you have to remove the prior coating if making a change of deck stain brand. Whenever you strip a deck stain, make sure to neutralize after with a wood deck brightener

Using the Same Deck Stain Brand for Reapplication?

No need to remove the old transparent, semi-transparent, or semi-solid deck stains coating for reapplying unless the old stain has failed by wearing and peeling unevenly. Uneven wear may lead to uneven application. In most cases when reapplying the same brand of deck stain, just use a wood deck cleaner and then a wood brightener for prep.

Reapplying a Solid Color Deck Stain?

In this case, it does not matter the brand or color. You can reapply over the top of the old solid color deck stain using these tips for prep: Reapplying A Solid Color Deck Stain

Switching to Solid Color Deck Stain

No need to remove the old transparent, semi-transparent, or semi-solid deck stains if you are switching to a solid color deck stain. Just make sure your deck is clean and free of dirt and mildew or any old stain that is peeling.

More Info on Prep for Deck Stains

Have a Deck Stain question? Ask in the comments below.

For more info, see our Deck Stain Facts section with over 150 simple Q&A articles that answer all the questions that you have regarding deck staining, cleaning, and prep.

Please Rate This. You may also post comments or ask questions below.

author avatar
Scott Paul ~ Restoring Wood & Decks Since 1993 Owner
As an article and comment contributor to the site, Scott has been around the pressure washing industry since attending college. In 1993 he started his first company called Oakland Pressure Wash specializing in exterior pressure washing and deck staining. That company evolved into OPW L.L.C. shortly thereafter concentrating more on exterior wood and deck restoration. Scott and his Deck Cleaning Michigan company have restored over 10,000 decks in the Metro Detroit area since the early years. He has become an authority in the deck restoration industry and has contributed to numerous wood restoration forums and informative sites. All the products he suggests through this site are sold through online sites and in retail stores, allowing the consumer to choose their own means of purchase. Scott’s eCommerce sites do sell many top brands he endorses and if you appreciate any of the help he has offered then feel free to purchase from one of them.
Subscribe
Notify of
guest
6 Comments
newest
oldest
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Thakura Borrero
Thakura Borrero
4 months ago

Hello. I am in north/central Florida, I had an 180 sqft deck built about a year and a half ago. I sealed it with oil based Olympic Maximum clear sealer about 6 months ago, never used any kind of stain, just clear sealer. Now it’s looking gray and dull, theres is also some mold/mildew on some spots. How should I prep it for staining?

I’m not sure what product I’m going to apply once its prepped yet, i have to decide wether i want to use solid stain or semi transparent. What will require less prep work? And maintenance in the future. Thanks so much.

WhatsApp Image 2023-12-26 at 10.20.06 (2).jpeg
WhatsApp Image 2023-12-26 at 10.20.06.jpeg
WhatsApp Image 2023-12-26 at 10.20.06 (1).jpeg
WhatsApp Image 2023-12-26 at 10.20.07.jpeg
Jazzy
Jazzy
11 months ago

Hello,

Why use a wood brightener after using a wood deck cleaner like TSPe on existing semi-transparent waterproof stain if you are refreshing with a new coat of the same product. Isn’t a wood brightener for bare wood? How does it brighten a stain?

Also I have a 22′ x 20′ deck. The stain looks fine for about 95% of the surface except for a foot long on one board and a few small peeled spots smaller than my hand. Do I really need to sand the whole deck down to bare wood or can I just sand those parts and feathered into the good parts?

Thank you!

Last edited 11 months ago by Jazzy
Jazzy
Jazzy
11 months ago

Your reply seems to be for bare wood and not this paragraph in your article where you are talking about reapplying on existing stain no stripping no sanding. Am I missing something on when to use a wood brightener?


[[[Using the Same Deck Stain Brand for Reapplication?

(No need to remove the old transparent, semi-transparent, or semi-solid deck stains coating for reapplying) unless the old stain has failed by wearing and peeling unevenly. Uneven wear may lead to uneven application. In most cases (when reapplying the same brand of deck stain, just use a wood deck cleaner and then a wood brightener for prep).]]]

You can also re-read the first paragraph of my initial question.

Thank you

6
0
Questions or leave a review, please comment!x