Find the Best Wood Deck Stain: Top-Rated Products for All Needs 4.7/5 (380)

The Best Deck Stains for 2022

With more than 20 years of experience in the deck restoration business, we have tried nearly every brand of deck stain and deck sealant on the market. We have talked to thousands of wood and deck restoration contractors, homeowners, and project managers about their projects to find out which deck stain products work and which do not.

We’ve also done our own hands-on testing of popular exterior wood and deck stains and compiled our ratings and reviews here to help you find the best deck stain for your 2022 home improvement projects.

Questions About the Best Stain for Your Deck?

Want personalized help? Just answer some deck restoration questions and then post your questions below in the comments and we’ll be glad to guide you toward the best deck stain and sealer.

Best Deck Stain Armstrong Clark

Armstrong Clark Semi-Trans Rustic Brown

Best Deck Stain Oil-Based: TWP 100 Pro Series Semi-Transparent

TWP 100 Deck Stain RatingsTWP 100 Pro Series semi-transparent stain penetrates well into the wood, fades lightly in color, and holds up to wear and tear. We like that when it’s time to redo the wood in 2-3 years, the TWP outdoor stain can be cleaned and re-applied or removed with ease. This makes the reapplication process much easier. TWP 100 Pro Series patio stain is only allowed in 35 states and cannot be used in Canada.

  • Stain Type: Penetrating semi-transparent, oil-based, full-curing exterior wood stain
  • Consumer Star Ratings: 4.5/5 (40)
  • DeckStainHelp.com Rating: 8.69/10
  • Website Link: TWP 100 Series
  • Wood and Deck Stain Photos: TWP 100 Series Photo Album

Best Deck Stain Water-Based: Restore-A-Deck Semi-Transparent Deck Stain

Restore A Deck Wood Stain ReviewRestore-A-Deck semi-transparent deck stain can be applied to dry or damp wood. Applying this stain to damp wood gives you the ability to prep and stain on the same day, saving you a tremendous amount of time. This Restore-A-Deck wood stain is an advanced, water-based, semi-transparent stain formulation designed to penetrate deep into wood pores for maximum protection and longevity. It’s compliant with regulations in all U.S. states and Canada.

Best Solid Color Deck Stain: Restore-A-Deck Solid Color Wood & Deck Stain

Restore A Deck Solid Color Stain ReviewRestore-A-Deck solid-color stain is our go-to solid-color/opaque deck stain for 2022 because of its ease of use, five pre-mixed solid colors (the only solid stain on the market that comes pre-mixed), and the ability to prep and stain on the same day, which adds extra convenience. It uses the latest advances in wood stain technology to seal and protect the wood by penetrating deep into the grain, shielding your deck from UV and water damage which is responsible for the growth of mold and mildew. It’s also compliant with regulations in all U.S. states and Canada.

Best-Applying Deck Stain: Armstrong-Clark Wood Stain

Armstrong Clark Wood Stain RatingArmstrong-Clark Wood Stain has consistently been a well-performing deck stain product. We really like how it penetrates deep into the wood grain and applies easily. Reapplication is simple with a good deck cleaner for the prep. It’s compliant with regulations in all U.S. states and Canada.

  • Stain Type: Penetrating transparent, semi-transparent, semi-solid oil-based, paraffin and curing oil blend, full-curing exterior wood stain
  • Consumer Star Ratings: 4.4/5 (59)
  • DeckStainHelp.com Rating: 8.5/10
  • Website Link: Armstrong Clark Stains
  • Wood and Deck Stain Photos: Armstrong Clark Stain Photo Album

Best Semi-Solid Wood Deck Stain: TWP Pro Series Semi-Solid Stain

TWP Semi-Solid StainThe TWP brand of stains is one of our most commonly used wood stain brands, as we have applied it to more than 10,000 decks over the past 25+ years as wood restoration contractors. What we like best about the TWP semi-solid stain is that it’s easy to apply, it’s easy to prep and reapply when the time comes, and it holds color very well, even under UV light. TWP semi-solid stain is only allowed in 35 states and cannot be used in Canada.

Best Wood Preservative Deck Stain: TWP 1500 Series Semi-Transparent Stain

TWP 1500 Series RatingTWP 1500 Series exterior deck stain is one of our top choices for the best outdoor wood stain because it does a great job of protecting the wood from rot and severe weather. TWP 1500 Series stain is the only deck stain on the market that is registered as a “wood preservative” with the EPA. As contractors, we really like stains that penetrate deep into the wood and can be reapplied without sanding. TWP 1500 Series patio stain fits this and more by adding excellent UV and mold protection. Maintaining TWP stain every 2-3 years is easy. TWP 1500 Series stain is compliant for all U.S. states but not Canada.

  • Stain Type: Penetrating semi-transparent, oil-based, full-curing, EPA-registered exterior wood stain
  • Consumer Star Ratings: 4.6/5 (28)
  • DeckStainHelp.com Rating: 8.5/10
  • Website Link: TWP 1500 Series
  • Wood and Deck Stain Photos: TWP 1500 Series Photo Album

Best Deck Stain for Mildew: Defy Extreme Semi-Transparent Wood Stain

Defy Extreme Stain ReviewDefy Extreme Semi-Transparent Wood Stain penetrates into the wood grain extremely well for a water-based stain, resulting in a non-filming coating that is not prone to peeling or wear from traffic. We use the Defy Extreme on about 30-50 deck restorations every year in the Midwest and it is one of the best outdoor wood stain options on the market to prevent mildew. Compliant for all US states and Canada.

  • Stain Type: Penetrating semi-transparent, water-based exterior wood stain
  • Consumer Star Ratings: 4.1/5 (54)
  • DeckStainHelp.com Rating: 8.47/10
  • Website Link: Defy Extreme Wood Stain

Best Deck-Resurface Coating: Gulf Synthetics Deck Revive

Gulf Synthetics Deck Revive ReviewHomeowners are always looking for an alternative to a deck replacement. When wood is neglected, it can be expensive to have it restored or replaced. If you’re looking for a deck resurfacing Stain, keep in mind that most users have had an unpleasant experience with products from Home Depot and Lowe’s. Reviews and user experiences with the majority of these products have been overwhelmingly negative. However, comments about Gulf Synthetics Deck Revive have been favorable.

Deck Stain Facts: Frequently Sought Answers

Often, when we’re helping people choose the best deck stain and sealer, we hear a lot of the same questions. Here are some facts and words of advice about exterior wood stain that can help answer these questions:

  • No exterior deck stain will last five or more years. A good-quality stain will last two or maybe three years on a deck floor (horizontal) and typically twice as long on railings and vertical surfaces.
  • Penetrating stains will have less chance of peeling, as they soak into the wood grain rather than settling as a film on top of the wood grain when fully cured.
  • Penetrating deck stains are easier to maintain by cleaning the deck and reapplying the stain after two to three years.
  • Filming deck stains that dry on top of the wood can be harder to remove and/or reapply, as they are more prone to peeling, wear, flaking, etc.
  • Not all deck stains are penetrating. Some brands may claim that they are, but it may not be the case when you apply it to your exterior space. Always do extra research to ensure that the stain you purchase is penetrating.
  • Semi-transparent, transparent, and semi-solid stains will show the grain of the wood to some extent. Solid stains, deck resurfacing coatings, and paints will not.
  • Clear sealers without any pigment/color will not prevent UV graying. Lighter pigmented stains that are transparent, semi-transparent, or semi-solid will have less UV protection than darker-pigmented stains in the same transparency. More color/tint means better UV protection.
  • Deck stain types include oil-based or water-based, filming or penetrating, and either transparent, semi-transparent, semi-solid, or solid (opaque). Deck resurfacing products are also an option.
  • Oil-based stains can still be used in all states and Canada as long as they comply with local VOC regulations.
  • When switching brands of deck stain, it’s always best to remove the old coating first. Do this by using a deck stain stripper and/or sanding.
  • Always apply a wood brightener after prepping with a stain stripper or wood deck cleaner to neutralize the pH.
  • New decks that have been installed less than a year before treatment have different needs than a deck that is more than a year old. New decks need to be prepped and usually cannot be stained right away.
  • Always prep your deck for the outdoor stain you use to ensure a long-lasting finish.

What Is the Best Deck Stain for You? How to Choose the Right Deck Stain Product

There is no one best exterior wood stain for decks and patios that will outperform every other stain every single time. A better way to approach this common question is to ask, “What is the best stain for my deck and its environment?” A wood deck stain that performs well in humid South Carolina may not fare as well in the snowy Midwest states. VOC (volatile organic compound) laws vary in different places as well, and this may limit what is available in your state or country. For example, TWP 100 Pro Series stain cannot be used in 17 states and Canada because its VOC content is above the legal limits in those places.

To understand which patio stain to choose, start by considering why your last coat of deck stain may have failed:

  1. UV rays from the sun will damage wood, resulting in the degradation of the wood’s cellular structure. This will break down the stain while causing the wood to oxidize (turn gray).
  2. Water, snow, and ice will cause damage to the wood by breaking down the exposed cell structure.
  3. Freezing and thawing tend to expand and contract the wood, weakening the stain’s bond with the wood cells.
  4. Mold, mildew, and algae will leave the wood unsightly/dirty and can cause rotting.
  5. High-traffic areas will wear faster.
  6. The previous stain used may have been of inferior quality or applied poorly.
  7. The wood may not have been prepped properly prior to application. Bad prep is the number one reason stains prematurely fail!

Once we figure out the primary reasons for failure, then we can look at what stains would be better for your deck or exterior wood. Here are the questions that will guide your choice:

  1. In which state is your deck located?
  2. How much sun/shade does your deck get?
  3. What type of wood is your deck made of?
  4. Do you have mold or mildew issues?
  5. Why/how did the previous stain fail?
  6. What type of stain did you use last time?

Let’s look at an example deck:

  1. Deck Location: Michigan
  2. Sun/Shade: Full sun in the morning, shade in the afternoon
  3. Wood Type: Cedar
  4. Mold/Mildew? No
  5. How Did the Last Stain Fail? Dried blotchy and peeled after the first winter
  6. Which Stain Was It? Behr Premium Semi-Transparent

Michigan currently has a VOC limit of 550, so all types of exterior deck stains are available. If you live in Canada, on the East Coast, or in California, then you may have different options. We would suggest a penetrating semi-transparent or semi-solid stain that does well with UV protection and fades evenly over time, making future reapplication easier. Based on these questions and answers, we would suggest one of these stains:

Let Us Help You Find the Best Wood Stain for You

Our experts are here to help you find the best wood deck stain for your situation! Just post a comment below with answers to these questions.

  • In which state is your deck located?
  • How much sun/shade does your deck get?
  • What type of wood is your deck made of?
  • Do you have mold or mildew issues?
  • Why/how did the previous stain fail?
  • What type and brand (if known) of stain did you use last time?

If you can, please add a picture or two of your deck’s current condition. We’ll do our best to suggest the best wood deck sealer and stain for your needs.

Choosing the Best Wood Deck Stain: A Video Guide


Please Rate This. You may also post comments or ask questions below.

Related Deck Stain Help Articles & Reviews

guest
27.8K Comments
newest
oldest
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Damon
Damon
1 day ago

Florida new redwood pressure treated 2×6 deck with a messy canopy of crepe myrtle trees mostly shaded with some sun 20×28 deck. Being replaced from cabots Australian timber oil failure. Mold and algae can build up from tree droppings any suggestions on semi transparent stain and sealer thanks

MSM
MSM
1 day ago

I’ve got a 25 year old deck in Northern Michigan that I’ve used Australian Timber oil on. I agree it’s not what it used to be-didn’t penetrate as well and had peeling on wood I replaced (after waiting 1 year after to seal).

it’s been 3 years since last application and ready for reseal with something else.

Can I do RAD full strip and change to water soluble? Would it be better to keep with oil base and if so do can I skip the stripping step?

image.jpg
image.jpg
Marilyn Kemper
Marilyn Kemper
3 days ago

Springfield, Missouri. East side of house in sun all morning with gradual shade progressing in the afternoon. We have periods of very wet weather and periods of very dry weather. Newer deck of untreated Yellawood, installed about 18 months ago. Cleaned it in May with Wolman’s cleaner/brightener (now by Rustoleum). Mildew had grown on rails and spindles. I know I will need to prep again before I stain it. My priority is something that will protect as long as possible. Prefer water-based but not sure whether semi-transparent or solid would be better.

Used Sherwin-Williams semi-transparent water-based on former pressure-treated wood deck. Looked great initially but poor performance over 1-2 years.

Bob
Bob
6 days ago

I live in Ohio. had a new deck built….want to apply a top rated water sealer not stain as I want to preserve the natural wood grain….so many choices here so much reading….whats the best suggestion for my need?

Cathy
Cathy
6 days ago

I live in Ohio, deck in sun, yes to mildew. Previously used Behr deckover which chipped, one board rotten ( pine). Stripped all deckover off with diamabrush, which was a lifesaver. Advice would be greatly appreciated. Don’t ever want another mess like this again.. Thinking semi transparent

20220614_093930.jpg
16564976771258565884946759723336.jpg
Cathy
Cathy
6 days ago

Thank you

gary
gary
7 days ago

I have a wooden deck that is over 30 years old. The wood is slightly rough and is splitting some. I cannot replace it now. I used One Time Wood about 10 years ago and it held up surprisingly well. My deck is under massive maple trees and gets very little direct sunlight. I live just southeast of Cleveland Ohio. There is no mold or mildew. I will be pressure washing the deck this summer. What would be a good product for my deck? Thanks

Brad
Brad
7 days ago

I purchased a home in the Midwest in Southern Indiana. The previous owner put a deck paint on the treated lumbar deck boards. Since the purchase the high traffic areas have flaked and so I decided to pressure wash and repaint. Well, most of the paint came off. There are still spots that stayed adhered pretty well and of course the deck sides and posts are still painted (not pressure washed). I am curious if there is an application I can put over the bare lumbar as well as the small paint spots that are still remaining? I was thinking I could burnwith a weed burner, removing the stick on paint and giving the wood a cool looking finish then applying a sealant. Possibly using a black or dark stain/sealer over the deck as is? Even going to the extreme of stripping the top boards of the deck with a diamond tipped angle grinder head that I’ve seen advertised. I know I can repaint but would rather try and find something that would last more than a season before flaking from foot traffic. Thanks for any advice.

Steve
Steve
7 days ago

I have an old deck 40 years + I would like a Semi-Solid Stain I live in Salt lake city

Annie
Annie
8 days ago

Eugene Oregon. So lots of rain except in summer. Yes to mold and mildew.
Cedar, 5 years old.
Never stained or sealed. Just washed annually with oxiclean or pressure washed.
Deck gets more shade than sun.

Joanne Peters
Joanne Peters
9 days ago

Central New York, South facing covered porch, pressure treated lumber on log home. Exposed to afternoon sun, halfway toward house. After a couple years the stain, opaque, is peeling and looks awful. Would love a penetrating stain that doesn’t peel. Also, our dog makes grand entrances and it shows!

16562423902324948947644320611314.jpg
16562424203153619112171054381373.jpg
Brian Fitzgerald
Brian Fitzgerald
10 days ago

Hello Scott – I live in Connecticut and have a 30 year old pressure treated deck which appears to have been treated several times, most currently (I’ve learned) with a Cabot Semi Transparent Oil stain about a year ago. That stain appears to have failed (faded), resulting in my pressure washing the deck, followed by use of the Thompson 3 in 1 brightener. The results of that effort were good, though certain boards appear slightly darker than others (due to shade I assume) with some displaying green patches which I believe to be algae. I assume sanding to be required at this point followed by an application of stain. Would you agree with this approach and if so, which type of stain (oil or water based) and brand would you suggest? Thank you, Scott!

Brian Fitzgerald
Brian Fitzgerald
9 days ago

Thanks Scott for your prompt reply. The leftmost image reflects the sunnyside of the deck, the middle image the shady side (with algae) and the final image reflects the current state of the railings. Any suggestions would be appreciated. Thank you!

IMG_1289.jpg
IMG_1292.jpg
IMG_1291.jpg
Brian Fitzgerald
Brian Fitzgerald
8 days ago

Thank you Scott for your help! Will pursue your direction….

Patty Dunn
Patty Dunn
10 days ago

We live in Mpls MN. Our cedar deck is 15-20 years old and the traffic area is in partial sun and shade, rest of the deck is shade. We have had some moss grow between or on edges of parts of deck, live with lots of tree coverage. Do lighter or medium grays show more than a dark solid stain? Our home is a taupe so would like to go a little lighter gray that leans toward a greige to lighten up backyard space. Will a medium gray show dog foot prints etc. more than a darker? wanting to lighten up the space a bit since back is so shady. Thanks!

Patty Dunn
Patty Dunn
10 days ago

we are in Minneapolis MN. Our cedar deck is 15-20 years old. The highest traffic area is partial sun the rest of the deck is mostly in shade.We get moss growing between some boards but haven’t really noticed mold or mildew? Previous stains only lasted a year or so and were transparent I can’t remember which brand. We have 2 golden retrievers who come and go from house to yard via the deck daily.

Milan Coxen
Milan Coxen
11 days ago

I live in Weirton, WV near Pittsburgh. New deck, 2×6 deck boards, all treated Lumber from 84 Lumber. Wood is dry, what kind of prep do you recommend before semi-transparent stain is applied? Is TWP 100 your choice for me? Thank you

Milan Coxen
Milan Coxen
10 days ago

Ok, thank you

Wendy King
Wendy King
12 days ago

Hello! I live in Colorado at about 7600 feet. I have a south-facing deck that had been stained and then painted but the paint is peeling after only a year. The wood a beautiful redwood and now it looks terrible! It was never meant to be painted but it was done without my approval. In addition, some of the boards had rotted because they were covered by some bricks. The boards have been replaced and I now want to remove the peeling paint and stain it properly. I really need some direction on what is best to use and that will be easier to maintain. HELP! Thank you in advance.

Wendy King
Wendy King
12 days ago

Update. Thank you. I should have been more clear. We do plan to scape and sand it off. The 4 boards that were rotted have been replaced. The rest of the boards are fine. Once that is complete I would like a suggestion on which or what kind of stain to use. It’s very dry here in the mountains and the sun is pretty strong on the deck in the afternoon. It’s not a covered deck.

Wendy King
Wendy King
7 days ago

Thank you!

Rose
Rose
12 days ago

Update: I’m in the PNW, greater Seattle area. Deck gets full morning and mid-day sun and lots of rain.

Rose
Rose
12 days ago

I have an old deck made with pressure treated wood (with incisions) that has never been finished. The boards are in decent condition, very few cracks etc. which stain do you recommend? I’m trying to blend in with new deck made with Trex Enhanced Basics in Clamshell. Pictures so before and after pressure washing deck.

7D00B0AC-7FC7-445F-9672-E1102CDC7D56.jpeg
791ABEF4-6A78-4DFF-9624-FDEE1F16DE68.jpeg
Rita
Rita
13 days ago

North Central PA. Our deck is pressure-treated pine. Full sun. no mold or mildew. The last stain was Olympic put on in the spring but after winter it was peeling off. Now, its all pressured washed and ready for a better product. What do you recommend? Thank You.

Ann
Ann
14 days ago

Oakland County, MI / Deck went from 50/50 sun/shade to 100% sun. / Cedar / No mold or mildew / Live in a wooded area with a lot of trees.

Cleaned deck built in 2019, just lightly power washed. Deck was originally sealed with Penofin Blue Label. Just lightly power washed the dirt off and the wood looks pretty good – but I’m not an expert! What is the best recommendation for sealing now to keep the deck in good shape?

Ann
Ann
14 days ago

Will do. Many thanks!

Kari Nezezon
Kari Nezezon
15 days ago

Hi, we are in upstate NY next to the Canadian border along the St.Lawrence River/Seaway. Our deck is made of pressure treated pine. We used Deckover and followed every instruction to the letter when applying it. There is a roof over the deck but still plenty of sun along the front edge. You can tell the spots where the deck over failed are due to sun, higher traffic, and snow/rain exposure. It seems obvious that the deckover didn’t penetrate the wood at all. It peels off easily. We have no problems with mold or mildew.

F8268922-E41E-428D-8994-12FEC27F755B.jpeg
01C48E5E-1C45-4A49-A3F4-8436032FF659.jpeg
D56B4931-843E-4085-91F5-0BF0D14BCBAA.jpeg
Kari Nezezon
Kari Nezezon
15 days ago

Once we’ve power sanded all the old deck over away, what product recommendations do you have for our location? Also, thank you for hosting this site. I have a hard time with using customer reviews to choose products. You never know if the person leaving a review really understood what and how to do whatever they needed to do to get the optimal result. I’ve read through a bunch of your responses here and am ready to do whatever you suggest. You’re clearly the guru! Thank you so much again!

Kari Nezezon
Kari Nezezon
2 days ago

Hi Scott, thank you for all the expertise. Can you guide us as to what to power sand with?

Kelly
Kelly
17 days ago
  1. Deck Location: NO deck, just 8×8 posts and beams on front porch; Southern Colorado at 8200 feet
  2. Sun/Shade: Full sun in the afternoon, shade in the morning
  3. Wood Type: Spruce
  4. Mold/Mildew? No
  5. How Did the Last Stain Fail? Not sure it is really failed at this point; 3 years since last stain on new wood; still looks OK; maybe faded a little
  6. Which Stain Was It? SuperDeck Transparent Stain 1902 Red Cedar
TERI DIETZ
TERI DIETZ
17 days ago

SW WA State, deck gets direct sun in summer months and outer boards get lots of rain the rest of the year as deck is only partially covered. We made the mistake of sanding new Tigerwood before building, which may also explain why annual maintenance is needed. We’ve used Gemini Cleaner, Neutralizer then Messmers Hardwood UV Plus each Spring so it’s time again. Have been researching online…

1) How does TWP 1500 series compare to Messmers?
2) Restore-A-Deck kit is three times the price of Gemini (same manufacturer, I understand) Is it worth the difference?

Many thanks!

TERI
TERI
16 days ago

Sorry, my mistake…I was deducing the RAD packages 300/600/1000 etc. as the square footage they completed.

I was surprised to read your comment about the Tigerwood, as I’ve read other reviews that at least imply “no maintenance for years”.

I didn’t find reference to Messmers anywhere in your reviews, but hubby will most likely stick with that, since we’ve used for several years.

Thanks for your time and expertise…very comprehensive website!

Shawn
Shawn
19 days ago

Central Oregon high desert
Lots of sun all day
I think its cedar
No issues with mold mildew 
My guess is that it is just old
Not sure but found an empty can of Penofin under one deck… you know what they say about assumptions.

I bought a home that has a couple of decks in various degrees of disrepair and lack of maintenance. I believe two of them can be saved but the other one will need new decking. I’ve been working on the first one when I came across this website. I initially tried to pressure wash the old stain off but that didn’t really work to well. I’ve finished sanding the first deck and thinking there must be an easier way. I sanded it with 80 grit and im thinking about using the restore a deck products to clean and brighten before staining. I’m not sure what kind of stain to use? Should I try the restore a deck stripper on the second deck? or just sand it too? or maybe both strip and sand? Any advice would be helpful.

attached pics of the sanded deck, the not yet sanded deck, and the empty can of finish I found.

PXL_20220616_163704278.jpg
PXL_20220526_005323005.jpg
PXL_20220526_005314032.jpg
PXL_20220526_005206620.jpg
Susan Long
Susan Long
20 days ago

In which state is your deck located? Alabama
How much sun/shade does your deck get? Constant sun
What type of wood is your deck made of? Treated lumber
Do you have mold or mildew issues? Brand New deck so no
Why/how did the previous stain fail? Brand New deck so doesn’t have anything right now.
What type and brand (if known) of stain did you use last time? Nothing yet

Dave
Dave
20 days ago

Location chicago il
Age 7 years
Wood pressure treated
No mold or mildew
Flaking
We started with olympic elite and ran out couldn’t find any anywhere,(covid) finished with Sherwin Williams.
Please help we love the red color

1655322989846839779003818797708.jpg
1655323026266239464455920973904.jpg
16553230548015990474759440120955.jpg
20220615_145236.jpg
Rita T
Rita T
21 days ago

I had a “two-steps-down” step made to go out a back door – I asked that the step be made of treated wood. I had no idea there were all types of treatments for wood. I’ve kept the very heavy “two-steps down” step inside my dry garage for a year (Twin Cities, MN area) and now I’d like to stain it with a tinted solid stain already purchased – Sherwin-Williams Super Deck solid waterborne. Now, I’ve read S-W deck stains aren’t very well rated. I saw in one of your answered questions for treated wood in order for it to “weather”, it must be outside – ugh! The step is built of new wood, can’t tell by just looking if it’s treated or not. I sprinkled water on a few boards today, and in about 11 minutes, the water droplets disappeared. There are several stamps on the wood steps – not all the characters are “clear”, thus the “?” marks. Stamps: – – “599 TP No. 2 KDHT?P”, “No. 2 P PINE 441”, “HT 71”, “KD19H1?”, “01229 ?EO”. Now, I’m wondering if my “two-steps-down” step is all made of the same treated wood?!? This step is going to sit on top of rocks or concrete pavers outside. QUESTION: Can I stain this step now with the S-W I bought – and if so, should I put an exterior latex primer on the knots in the wood first? Or do I have to wait and weather this step outside first – and if so, for how long? Then prime and stain it with the stain I’ve bought? I’ve batted a thousand making mistakes, so at this point, I at least want to “stain” the step the best way possible.
Thanks so much for whatever help you can give me.
Rose

mait
mait
22 days ago

Hi, I’m located in south central Wisconsin. My deck is exposed to sunlight most of the day with little to no shade. I believe the deck is made of pressure treated pine, it’s about 15 years old. It was painted by the previous owners, and we’re in the process of stripping the peeling paint off. There is slight mildew, mainly underneath the deck boards. The plan is to take off as much paint as possible (sanding, stripping, pw), clean with Restore-A-Deck cleaner and brightener before staining. What type of stain would you recommend?

JPEG image 8.jpeg
JPEG image 6.jpeg
JPEG image 4.jpeg
JPEG image 2.jpeg
Aliusa
Aliusa
24 days ago

Hi, applied BM Aborcoat, looked great. After 24 hours there was passing rain, maybe for 40 mins and then sun came out. Now I have what appears to water stains. The area that’s lighter is shiny and bit tacky to the touch. Definitely not like that in the morning. Any idea of this can be salvaged? Thanks!

PXL_20220611_225302026.jpg
PXL_20220611_225600374.jpg
PXL_20220611_225645115.jpg
Blake E Moores
Blake E Moores
26 days ago

Hi,
The deck is in western NC. 3/4th of the day in the sun.It was stained multiple times with Cabot Australian Jarrah Brown oil stain over a 15 year period. After 1-1/2 years it is weathered badly. Last application after clean , pressure wash did not absorb well ( was hot day) The wood has linear cracks.
A portion exposed rarely gets sun and those areas are getting green mildew. Areas under cover look great and have only been re-stained 1x.
The winters are cold and windy, summers are high 80’s and tons of rain ( 42’/y). Verticals are good.
I plan to clean, PW and sand the horizontals. What stain will adsorb, try to seal cracks, and repel water ( want to avoid ice expansion & wood cracking more). I was hoping NOT to do much with the covered deck portion ….Oil, water base, semi transparent, sealer????
THANKS!
Blake

SR-deck view2.JPG
SR deck.JPG
SR-deck view.jpg
Blake E Moores
Blake E Moores
24 days ago

THANKS!

Arthur Horecki
Arthur Horecki
26 days ago

Hi, I have a deck that is cedar, newly built last October 2021, I am at 9,800 feet, so UV protection is important, I know I need to whiten the deck then what stain to use with UV consideration? Some reviews of TWP were not kind in regards to fading.

Steve Stahl
Steve Stahl
27 days ago

Hello,
I am in MA on Cape Cod less than a between a quarter and a half mile to both the bay and ocean (as a crow flies). Summers can be hot, but fall and winter can be very damp.
The deck gets the morning and early afternoon sun for less than half the day. Some parts get much less.
The last sealer I used was Bond’s One Time (Natural), I don’t know how many years ago… maybe 8 years ago.
The deck is mahogany. Probably 20 to 30 years old, but still solid.
I don’t know what we get, but under a Birch tree it sometimes gets very slippery with green. Pressure washing with water removes it. I do this every few years. An outdoor shower area can get slippery too.
I don’t know that it ever failed as there was no layer on top of the wood. The stain was one that relied on sunlight to cure it
The prior sealer was Bond’s One Time (natural).
I was looking at Cabot Australian Timber Oil or Armstrong-Clark hardwood and IPE stain, but am open to any suggestion. Also I am wondering what semi transparent stain would look most like newer mahogany without being too dark (the house is grayed cedar shingles. One last item, I prefer quicker drying time, as I have dogs that need the back yard. Thanks in advance for your recommendation.

Steve Stahl
Steve Stahl
26 days ago

Hi Scott,
Thanks for quick response, and the heads up on Cabot. It just rained here so these pics show everything quite wet. I can post dry pictures tomorrow afternoon if that would be helpful – much more rain coming here very shortly. There are three pics. Two with two different areas of green (algae?) and one of the basic deck without any green. I was planning to do prep, just hoping that sanding isn’t necessary. Last time I sanded, the rental machine wouldn’t hold the sanding pads well. Let me know if other pics would be helpful. Thanks again, Steve

Deck pick with green1.jpg
Deck with pale green3.jpg
Deck1.jpg
Steve Stahl
Steve Stahl
26 days ago

Hi Scott, I didn’t even think there was any stain left. Are you sure? Should I send a picture when it is completely dry? Could that possibly change your thinking? Obviously you are the expert here, just wondering in the very recent rain makes it look different than it actually is. I don’t want a solid color stain. If what you say is correct, what about just retreating with One Time? Thanks.

Steve Stahl
Steve Stahl
26 days ago

Will do. Supposed to be sunny all day tomorrow. will take pics after it looks completely dry. Thanks.

Steve Stahl
Steve Stahl
25 days ago
Reply to  Steve Stahl

Here are the dry pics. Thanks for considering these pics also. Regards,
Steve

20220610_192444.jpg
20220610_192457.jpg
20220610_192508.jpg
Steven Stahl
Steven Stahl
24 days ago

Thanks Scott, and would you recommend the hard wood sealer/stain?

Steve Stahl
Steve Stahl
23 days ago

Thank you, Scott!

Steve Stahl
Steve Stahl
23 days ago

Hi Again,
I have checked your site thoroughly and do not see how to use the stripper and brighter. I would like to know that before I order. I want to understand the whole process. Thanks. I am looking at using Restore-a-deck for all components.
Steve

Steve Stahl
Steve Stahl
22 days ago

Looking more carefully, do you see any advantage of Defy versus RAD for older mahogany in my situation?

Steve Stahl
Steve Stahl
25 days ago

Scott, Following up for yesterday, Here are three dry pics Taken at the end of a sunny day. Regards,
Steve

Mary Ann Bergman
Mary Ann Bergman
28 days ago

Can I paint over the restore10X paint?. It is starting to peel after 8 years and can’t afford to remove it . Please tell me what brand of paint I can use. I want to paint it a dark gray.

Paul D.
Paul D.
29 days ago

State MA
Sun Direct sun 8hrs + per day
Wood .60 Pressure treated 35 years old paint sanded off over 30 yrs ago
Mildew mold No
Previous stain Applied 2 coats last summer after using deck cleaner and pressure washing wood
looks dry, water does not bead
Brand Sherwin Williams Superdeck Clear sealer
What would you recommend?

Thanks
Paul

image1.jpeg
image2.jpeg
image0 (2).jpeg