Update on Deck Stains for 2019 4.6/5 (12)

by Deck Stain Help

Deck Stains in 2019

– What’s new? What really works? What types are there?

Today we will be reporting what’s new in the deck staining industry for 2019. Out two years ago is the Restore-A-Deck wood stain. The Restore-A-Deck Wood Stain can be applied to damp wood, allowing for prep and stain to be completed on the same day. Restore-A-Deck Stain uses the latest in water-based wood staining technology to create a formula that allows for better UV protection, excellent penetration into the wood stain for long lasting beautiful results, and the ability to apply to damp wood for single day project completion. The Wood Stain comes in four radiant semi-transparent colors that highlight and enhance the natural wood grain.

Which stains really work? With the help of thousands of people who have completed deck stain projects over the years, we consistently see the same higher quality stains outperforming lower quality stains. Hands-down, semi-transparent wood stains seem to receive raving reviews as far as the quality and durability go. As always, be sure to choose a high-quality semi-transparent wood stain, as low-quality semi-transparent wood stains fail to penetrate the wood grain and make maintenance a pain. Click here to see the top 6 rated deck stains.

Here is a rundown of the different deck stain types that exist. We encourage you to do your own research to determine which type of deck stain will work the best for your project.

Deck Stains News for 2019

Water-based deck stains are environmentally friendly and abide by newer, stricter VOC regulations. They are easier to clean up. However, they tend to be a little more difficult to apply. The top water-based deck stains are Restore A Deck Stain and the Defy Extreme. Both offer superior penetration over other water-based stains.

Oil-based deck stains provide excellent penetration into the wood and are more natural looking. They may come at a cost in that they can promote mildew growth in some areas as they take longer to dry. The best oil-based stains will offer mildewcides to prevent or stop the growth of mildew and mold. Examples: TWP Stains and Armstrong Clark Stains

Deck Resurface coats work like thick paint. They can provide excellent UV protection and fill cracks if it actually works. If selecting a Deck Resurface Stain, keep in mind that most users have had a bad experience with products from Home Depot and Lowes.  While the majority of comments and user experiences reported are negative,  the Gulf Synthetics Deck Revive has been favorable.

Solid Decking Stains (opaque) cover the wood grain completely, providing excellent UV protection. At the same time, they film on wood, do not penetrate well, and require sanding and scraping to remove.

When using a solid stain. See this article: Best Solid Color Deck Stains

Semi-Solid Stains show a small amount of wood grain and provide very good UV protection. Oil-based semi-solid versions provide superior penetration. The best semi-solids stains are made by Armstrong Clark which is a deep penetrating oil-based stain.

*Our Top Picks are Semi-Transparent Stains These stain types allow the wood grain to show and if they truly soak into the wood grain, reapplying is easier down the road. Top 6 rated deck stains

Transparent Wood Stains are very easy to apply & reapply and are natural looking. They provide lower than average UV protection

Clear Wood Deck Finishes do not change the appearance of your deck and are easy to apply. However, they gray and oxidize in months. These are great if you want to seal and protect the wood but want the wood to gray naturally. The Defy Extreme Clear and the TWP 1500 Series in Clear work well for this.

Non-Drying Oil vs. Drying Oil-Based Stains: Drying oils are curing oils that seal the wood. Non-drying oils never dry and penetrate the surface of the wood to help condition the wood.

We want to hear your input. What works for you? Do you have any deck stain news? Comment below.

Please Rate This. You may also post comments or ask questions below.

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ronald goldman
ronald goldman

My house has tongue in groove clear cedar siding which has been treated in the past with TWP products. This caused a change from the lovely golden color to a dark brownish color. The contractor said there was no alternate to the color change. The TWP product did give long time protection. I need to retreat the wood as its now very dry. What product would you suggest? Can I lighten the current dark color in the process?

Cindy
Cindy

I live in Clarkston Michigan. My cedar deck is 4 years old and it has been stained twice with a oil based semi transparent Flood’s stain, last done May 2018. The deck is on the North side of the house. Did not even hold up through one season. My home is a cedar log home with similar stain on it and that is wearing fine so was trying to get the deck to match the house. Staining a deck every year is not my cup of tea but if I have to, it is what it is and I would like to know what product to use. I have also considered power washing all the stain off or let it finnish wearing off and let it age and be grey, I do have grey stone
fireplace on deck wall so might not look that bad.

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Scot
Scot

Stripping and staining.
Older wood with new wood railing
Faded stain on deck greyed wood never stained on rails.
Switching to new stain and color.
Believe the current is Olympic maximum semi trans oil.
No mold.
Previous is 4-5 years old and faded.
I have a lot of galvanizedu wire and panels for railing and want to make sure the strippers or prep wont harm those materials.

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Jessica Rainey
Jessica Rainey

I have 1600 sq ft wrap around porch that is 15 years old. The wood spindles and rails don’t look like they have ever had anything on them. The wood floor seems to have a semi transparent stain (what’s left of it). I have cleaned it with a bleach and water combo. I was thinking of putting a semi solid stain on the floor. Can I use the same stain on the spindles and rails? HELP! I’m in way over my head. What do you recommend?

Patrick Merrigan
Patrick Merrigan

Would like to know your collective opinion of the Penofin products. Specifically the Ultra Premium (Redwood). I realize that you do NOT always “get what you pay for”, but I see that this particular product is $47 per gallon in my local hardware store. Thank you.
Note: …my 6 questions on deck info posted a few days ago.

Veronica Ann Thompson
Veronica Ann Thompson

My deck is old and we have had to do some repairs. As such, it will be necessary to use a solid stain. What company or companies do yu recommend for solid stain. I could not find any on this page

Joe Ryan
Joe Ryan

Hi, what are your thoughts on Cutek CD50 oil for a new mahogony deck?
Thanks!

Chet Jenkins
Chet Jenkins

Hello…we live on the (rain) coast in the Pacific Northwest.
We will be staining a cedar fence with pressure treated 4 x 4 posts.
When it comes to selecting a stain would you recommend using an oil based product over a water based one…or does it matter.
Most informative web site !
Thank you very much for your insight.

Janeen Tibbetts
Janeen Tibbetts

We purchased a poplar 10 ft table with benches that had been stained? after one year it was a mess, pretty much gone. the seller came back took the set and sanded and applied an oil base stain that look good most of the summer. now not so good – we want to stain it ourselves with the right product that will preserve the wood. help!!

Zona Alapuranen
Zona Alapuranen

Hi,
Just put a HUGE deck off our back porch and around our pool. The wood is drying now before we stain. We are clueless since this is our first deck ever. I would like:

1. A tint but still have the deck grain show through.
2. Sealed so it’s protected from the elements
3. Non slippery (if that’s even possible)

The contractor who built our deck said SW has a product that is a stain and seal combo? However, when I look at their site I don’t see something like that.

We want top notch protection with a hint of color. Is there a product that does both? How long does the product last before we re apply? We live in Florida so it’s humid and sunny. Any advice is appreciated.

Steve
Steve

I need to purchase stain that’s solid and is long lasting for an outside deck. I’ve looked into Behr, Benjamin more’s ARBORCOAT, sherwin-williams, Cabot, TWP, Olympic, etc and I am confused!

My deck is about 9 years old, I need to use Solid stain and we prepped it by fully sanding the entire deck to 60 Grid.

It would be great to pick stain brand that is easy to get a sample of like Cabot at Lowes or Arborcoat at Benjamin More. I do care more about the long lasting one.

DEE.
DEE.

SOLID REDWOOD DECK 2 YEARS OLD. WE APPLIED CLEAR TRANSPARENT .IT WASHED OUT FAST . WE ARE LOOKING AT A SOLID .WHAT DO YOU THINK?

Jim Weinmeyer
Jim Weinmeyer

I have a redwood deck (20+) yeas old. In the past I have used Penofin to stain the deck and it is in excellent condition. The contractor I hired to power wash and stain the deck is suggesting a product called Ready Seal. Any significant difference between the two?

Mike Reilly
Mike Reilly

I have been stripping my deck that was stained by the previous owner. The stain is several years old but I do not have a definite age. The railings appear to have a solid stain on them as it has been difficult to remove. The decking has stripped and cleaned up nice. I have removed about 80% of the stain on the railings but have some stubborn areas and areas where the balusters are sandwiched between 1×2’s and I cannot get the stain out of these areas. I plan to use TWP oil based stain on the decking but don’t think I can use it on the rails since I cannot get all of the old stain off. I assume I can use Flood Solid deck stain on the rails but am curious if I could use the Armstrong Clark semi solid over areas where I could not get all of the stain off. Appreciate any thoughts on how to best proceed.

A Quint
A Quint

We’re about to buy a house in Florida in a yard that has a fair number of trees. Part of the existing fencing can remain, some needs replacing. I know both old and new will need cleaning and brightening (old hasn’t been stained before), but given it’s a fairly damp area, I don’t know if I could then use an oil based stain (my preference) or would be better off using a water based stain . If I could go with oil based, which is best as far as minimizing growth of mold?