Darker Color Deck Stains Will Last Longer 4.9/5 (16)

by Deck Stain Help

Updated February 2020

Will Darker Color Deck Stains Will Last Longer?

DeckStainHelp.com remains the Internet’s go-to site for all things exterior wood surface restoration related. Below we explain why darker color deck stains will last longer, so if you are looking for a long-lasting stain, choose a darker color. We encourage customer interaction on our site, so feel free to leave us a comment below.


Armstrong Clark Stains

Armstrong Clark Stains

The lifetime of a deck stain is determined by several different factors. Weather, climate, sun exposure, and foot traffic are some of the main factors that will determine the longevity of a deck stain. Out of these main key factors, sun exposure is probably one of the most damaging elements to a stain’s integrity. Harmful UV rays can break down the protecting elements of a wood stain in a season or two.

Most deck stains provide water protection but not all of them will provide UV protection. When exterior wood is exposed to the sun it becomes discolored and faded. The top layer of wood fibers turns gray as they are damaged by harmful UV radiation. One key element in the fight against sun damage can be the amount of pigment found in the stain. Color pigments will act like sunscreen and provide a certain amount of sun protection.

Darker Color Stains Will Last Longer

The more pigment in the stain formula, the more it will protect against sun damage. For example, a completely clear wood stain will provide no UV protection at all. A heavily pigmented stain will provide a lot of UV protection. More pigment can be found in darker color stains, therefore they will last longer. A very light transparent natural color stain will fade and wear off much faster than a darker color stain.

At the same time, very heavy pigmented stains can be harder to maintain. Some stains, like very heavy pigmented solid stains that are almost like paint, can have other issues like peeling and cracking. The trick is to find a penetrating decking stain that gives you the appearance you want, is user-friendly, easy to apply, and will provide an adequate amount of UV protection. Penetrating fully into the wood grain means you have little to no peeling or wearing.

Just remember that darker color stains will last longer than lighter color stains for transparent, semi-transparent, and semi-solids.

Please Rate This. You may also post comments or ask questions below.

Related Deck Stain Help Articles & Reviews

26
Ask a Question or Post a Review

avatar
 
smilegrinwinkneutralshockunamusedcooloopsrollcryeeklolmadsadexclamationquestionhmmbeg
Photo and Image Files
 
 
 
 
Audio and Video Files
 
 
 
 
newest oldest
Angela
Angela

Hi.
I bought a home and the deck is 9 years old and never treated. I bought “TECHNISEAL” WOOD PROTECTOR WATER BASE (CHOCOLATE COLOR).is it a good choice.and I live in Quebec.
Thanks

Jean
Jean

The house we bought has a painted covered deck.ithas been painted green. We cleaned it and power washed some come off. We want
to paint it Black. What should I use or do

Stephanie
Stephanie

Looking at staining my deck with Sikkens, butternut color. We have no shade except for evening. Would this color be dark enough to help protect from UV?

Linda
Linda

Which stain reflects heat from sun more? Solid or transparent? We put solid color on wood steps and on a hot day cannot walk on it.!

ginger shoults
ginger shoults

We have just pressure washed our transparent brown deck and have chosen benj.moore celtic blue for fence. Trying to decide on using same color (which looks light w/blue tint) on deck itself or a darker shade of same family called Normandy (benj.moore) for deck & railings? Other choice is either color for deck and add darker brown on posts & rails. Def. Keeping Celtic blue on fence. Need advise on floor, post and rail. Dont think we want brown on floor again. So basically match floor w/ fence or darker blue? Any advise?

20180502_071523.jpg
20180503_193838.jpg
20180502_063453.jpg
Tim
Tim

I am considering a decking oil instead of the usual stain that forms a membrane that will certainly wear in the traffic areas and leave the unworn areas unable to accept stain. Even the products described as “penetrating” form this membrane. Refinishing then requires complete removal of the old finish. Is this a good idea? I believe that an oil can be reapplied over a previously oiled unevenly worn surface and will absorb where needed and can be wiped off where it does not absorb, resulting in an even new finish, without requiring sanding. Correct? Or, is there an alternative My research has turned up only a couple choices: one is Ipe oil for hardwoods ( I am using cypress, a soft wood ). The other is a product sold by Cutek America. Most products I found were sold only in Europe, Canada and Australia.

Leigh
Leigh

Hi, is the picture above Rustic Brown by Armstrong in semi transparent or semi solid?

jemma
jemma

Hi, Do darker stains cause the wood to heat more in the sun and therefore cause more weathering and damage of the wood from heating and cooling than a lighter stain? Therefore would our choice of a dark stain over a light shorten the life of the wood? We are currently choosing from Resene Woodsman decking stain a waterborne acrylic based stain?. Thanks smile

kumar
kumar

your website is very nice and gives very good info related to staining, learned a lot after reading all different topics explained in the website, planning to get my deck stained (7 years old), after lot of research decided to go with TWP semi transparent stain 1500 series (oil based), but one question is in this brand a darker color like say 1503 Dark Oak color is much better than cedar / redwood / rustic color for it to last longer like explained in this article, want to make sure I understand it right and take right decision wrt color. Thank You

Lisa P
Lisa P

Thanks. We're considering using Penofin Verde Mission Brown on an Clear A grade redwood fence (new wood). Can we expect than with "99%" UV protection, that the boards would remain about the same color over a year or two? Or would they darken considerably? I've read that some also recommend applying a Marine spar finish over the Verde for extra protection. Do you concur? Thank you!

Laura
Laura

What color stain was used on the deck picture above?

Susan
Susan

Hi, your site is great with wonderful info. I have a couple of questions. We had Behr deck stain (which of course failed and they returned money IF you still had receipts.) This deck surrounds an above ground pool. We have finally removed the stain completely and have use the deck wash to get it ready to accept a stain. (We did not remove the stain on the spindles surrounding deck bc we they are not in as bad of shape since they are verticle….is too exhausting to do so right now)
1. We would like to used a medium brown semitransparent oil based stain. We live in Va. And our deck has full sun most of the day. Which would you recommend for around the pool?
2. Also, we have some rather large chunks taken out of the wood and have epoxied them. Will this affect the color too much where these areas were epoxied?
3. Should we retain every year or other year to continue to protect?
4. At our last home we had a covered deck and used CWF and just applied a coat every year and it worked great .
5. What Is the highest temperature with whatever you recommend for us to stain can be applied under and how long does it need before rain/gets wet
6. Thank you Sooo very muh. This has been a nightmare that I never want to go through again..we still have another deck attached to our house to contend with. : (