Advantages to Having a Two-Toned Deck 5/5 (18)

by Deck Stain Help

Update 2019 on Two-Toned Decks

Two-toned decks are popular among many deck owners for 2019 for multiple reasons. A two-toned deck normally has paint or solid deck stain on the railings and spindles and the deck floor is stained with a transparent or semi-transparent deck stain.

There are several advantages to having a two-toned deck. Being able to match or blend the deck in better with the house without having to give up the natural wood look is one benefit. Most houses have 2-3 different colors including the siding, trim, shutters, gutters, fascia, etc. When a wood deck is all natural with a translucent stain it sticks out more from the house. Some deck owners like the deck to blend with the house a little better so they coat the railings and supports with a solid deck stain color to match. The deck floor can then be stained with a semi-transparent stain so it still has that natural wood appearance.

The color options are almost limitless for the railings and spindles because you are using a solid deck stain or paint. These can be tinted to almost any color imaginable while most transparent stains are normally limited to tones of naturals, browns, and reds.

When deck paint or solid stains are applied properly on vertical surfaces they are extremely durable and can last a long time. On a vertical surface film forming, solid stains can last up to 10 years and may only need to be cleaned occasionally. However, solid stains and paints do not perform well on horizontal surfaces such as decking and are prone to cracking and peeling so only use them on the vertical surfaces.

A properly done two-tone deck can really add appeal and value to your property. It may take a little more time and labor initially but as some deck owners know, the end result can be amazing.

For A Solid Stain on the verticals/railings we suggest:

For a semi-transparent stain for the flooring/horizontals look at:


Please Rate This. You may also post comments or ask questions below.

56
Ask a Question or Post a Review

avatar
 
smilegrinwinkneutralshockunamusedcooloopsrollcryeeklolmadsadexclamationquestionhmmbeg
Photo and Image Files
 
 
 
 
Audio and Video Files
 
 
 
 
newest oldest
Tom m
Tom m

Am thinking about staining my year old non stained deck 2 tone. I am thinking g about using Armstrong nature oak semi transparent on floor and their cedar semi transparent on the railing. Do you think their will be enough contrast between the two to look right

8AF13E4B-B3AC-4017-9C1C-198302D3FF71.jpeg
0BF27749-83AD-4823-8A04-B769354C6029.jpeg
A7E980BE-7589-4F3F-B9CC-8825DAF81908.jpeg
7DF25AD4-1EBB-48FC-875F-D07452D830C7.jpeg
joe
joe

We have replaced the decking of a previously painted deck, and allowed it to age 1 year and then prepped it and will be staining it with AC semitransparent. We did not replace the railings and the facing boards below the deck (which is 15′ up), which are stained with Cabot solid, and which we will continue to use. It is difficult to stain the vertical edges and endcuts of the decking without it dripping down on the facing boards, and cleanup is difficult due to the height. Can we use the Cabot solid on the vertical edges and enducts of the decking, or would this look strange and/or not be a good idea for some other reason? If not, how would one control the dripping? Thanks!

Foothills Family
Foothills Family

We had our deck rebuilt last July. The decking, stairs and sides are composite, and the uprights and deck supports are pressure treated wood. It’s time to stain the wood, and from what I read I see solid stain recommended for vertical surfaces and semi-solid for horizontals. What is recommended? Thank you!

Deck stairs.jpg
Deck underside.jpg
Deck .jpg
Connie Olson
Connie Olson

We didn’t do the right research when we built our upper deck. It started out as a maintence project and turned into a complete tear down and rebuild. We used regular pine, sanded & stained as it was being built with all in one Behr. Less than 2 years later, with mildew, and peeling, we are re-doing. We were advised to use the stripper that matched the stain we used, so used the Behr stipper. Not very helpful & very messy. Doing the research now, I realize I should not have used regular pine, or sanded or stained when being built. We have been sanding this 12×14 deck for hours & hours (with helpers). The spindles are tedious & it is challenging to get to all the nooks and crannys. I am trying to preserve the underneath by not having to sand and restain. I am hoping I will be able to scrub off the stipper than left white from between the floorboards on the underside. The deck gets all afternoon sun. We also added rafters/pergola above which gets the worst UV exposure. I am considering replacing the pergola with cedar or pressure treated wood. If I do, is there any product I can use on it now or do I need to wait until next year to take them all down again and add perhaps a clear marine varnish or a stain?

I want to clarify that the semi transparent stain is better on the floors/top rails vs. semi solid. Is an elastomeric coating an option I should pursue?

I was all set to go with AC semi trans & they have been so helpful to answer questions on the phone & mailed me samples. However, I came across a website that tested many stains over 14 months, & the AC stain was graying considerably. Now I am looking at TWP or Cabot. However, I like the fact I reach an owner when I call, I have actual samples to test the color and the reapplication doesn’t require special products to clean the deck.

I was also set to use an oil stain this time and then I read that the water based stains last longer. The more I research, the more confused I become.

My goal is to make the best of what I have with the longest lived product available.

Thank you!

Chris
Chris

New deck installed last fall, allowed to cure through winter and spring, now time to stain. Trying to decide all one semi-transparent vs. a two-tone since the design of the deck would look nice that way. Considering a darker stain on the “frame” and verticals and a lighter stain on the 45 degree pieces. I don’t want to use any solid since both colors will be on the horizontals. Thoughts? Recommendation on brand and color? I plan on cleaning and brightening either way.

image.jpg
image.jpg
Jeff
Jeff

Hi, we’re purchasing a new home in northern VA and the deck is being completed this week. It will get a little sun in the morning and then be shaded the rest of the day. We’ll be following the advice we’ve seen here (waiting 2-3 months and using proper prep, cleaner, brightener). We are interested in possibly doing a two-tone deck; the house is beige with white trim. A couple of questions:

1. We would do the railings and spindles in white but I’m not sure what else. The railing are mounted to the sides, not the top. Our thoughts for the horizontal deck was a darker shade of brown in either semi-solid or semi-transparent.

2. Semi-transparent vs. Semi-solid. Thoughts? Do they hold up equally well?

3. The stairs and supports. I assumed they would be in the darker color but unsure. Basically I’m unsure how to make this look good in two-tone.

Thanks for any input.

20180401_123004.jpg
20180401_123015.jpg
20180401_123045.jpg
Don Vaughn
Don Vaughn

I have stained my deck with Olympic Stain 3 times over the last 20 yrs and loved it. However the last time (last summer) it started to peel off in spots. What can i do to correct this problem before I restain it this year?

Doug
Doug

I installed new deck wood in June this year, it is not Oct 3. Should I wait until next spring to stain or has it been enough time to stain before winter?

Dana Millard
Dana Millard

I have a stain that I need stripped off. I did a small section to test it. The salesman said to do 10 ft sections at a time. The question is, do I put the revive on it RIGHT after I am done with each section or do I wait till I get the whole deck done? what is the time frame between stripper and revive.?

John Walsh
John Walsh

I have a two tone deck in Massachusetts; my railings have several coats of solid stain which is peeling and mildewy. Chemical strippers do nothing. Floor was painted with Behr deck restore (unfortunately) two years ago and so I am sanding ALL wood bare prior to refinishing.. My question(s):
1)Do I need to do any SPECIAL PREP AFTER SANDING BARE or can I simply apply the finish right away? I want to refinish with a semi solid or semi trans on the deck surface but would love to cover up defects with a more opaque finish, PREFERABLY ONE THAT CAN BE TINTED. The wood is pressure treated pine and is about 20 years old. I can’t seem to find any tintable stains outside of Sherwin-Williams which I do not want to use.
2)Can you RECOMMEND A HIGH QUALITY STAIN WHICH CAN BE TINTED? I cannot use a high VOC product in Massachusetts.
3)IS IT REALLY MISSION CRITICAL TO RESAND AFTER RAIN?Also I have read that if the wood gets wet after sanding that the grain would raise and would have to re-sand. I am using a Metabo paint remover tool followed by a 36-40 grit sandpaper.

Daisy
Daisy

I stained my deck shortly after it was built last summer, with a semi-transparent stain by Sherwin Williams. The stain is peeling & is worn off. I now realize I should have waited for a year before staining it. I plan to strip it & clean it with Restore a Deck product & will be using Armstrong Clark semi-transparent stain. Will it be ok to stain it now, or should I wait another year.

Mary
Mary

Best stain for a new deck(8 months old)?
Alabama
Full sun, southern exposure with a screened in area.
Originally I was thinking of going with white railings and grey deck floor, but may be leaning towards a more “traditional” deck floor color since semi-transparent is the way to go rather than a solid on floor.

image.jpg
image.jpg
image.jpg
Christa
Christa

What is the easiest method to paint/stain around the bottom of the balusters (where white meets brown)? Use blue tape on that area? Or use an edger?

camy
camy

Any reviews on Sherwin William Super Deck semi-trans exterior stain

John Veselka
John Veselka

I had a new deck installed one year ago, I used TSP with Bleach and water on my deck and I thought it would turn out good and be ready to stain… I rinsed it very very well but the next day all I had was wood fuzzies… I had to company’s out and they told me I would have to sand the deck to get it even and get rid of the fuzzies… I tried using my had held palm sanding but it did nothing so I took out my belt sander with 80 grit sand paper and that still did not get rid of all the fuzzies… I had a company come out and he used a wood striper on a few spot but we kept getting some kind of residue on the Scotch green pad,
We tried going over the same area a few times with the stripper and it does look a little better but not good enough to use a transparent satin… I was wonder if there is a place I could send the wood to see if there is sometime type of chemical in the wood the is causing me this problem??? I do not want to paint it a solid color.. I talked to lowes who did a great job installing the deck and asked them if they knew where to wood came from.. they said they get most of there wood from Georgia Pacific… Does anyone have any idea where I could take some of the wood to get it tested to see if there is something in it??? just can not get it clean a residue keep coming on the paid everything I used the stripper on it…

Kay Stanley
Kay Stanley

My cleaner dried before I put the brightener on it. Can I still put the brightener on it?

Kristin
Kristin

In the picture above the railings and the horizontal wood on top of the railings are all white, but I read your comments about the horizontal surfaces peeling with the solid stain. I prefer the horizontal top of the railings to be the same color as the vertical posts, as in the picture, with the floor of the deck a different semi-transparent color. Is there any way to achieve this look or am I stuck staining the top of the railings and the deck floor the same color, with just the posts and railings white?

Haley Birkeland
Haley Birkeland

We are doing a two tone deck. It used to have a solid stain so we have done the stain stripper, sanded, and are getting ready to do our brightener on the deck itself. we will be doing an oil based more transparent stain on deck. For railing we want to do a solid stain or paint (different color). It is still in good shape but there is some peeling on railings. How should we prep the railings? I am planning to do a gentle sanding remove obvious peeling stain. Do we need to use the cleaner and brightener as well? Or is in necessary to remove every bit of stain as we did for the deck?

Mary
Mary

I'm a novice when it comes to any sort of home repairs and maintenance. We bought a house 2 years ago and are just getting to the decks now. The decks are very old, gray, split, and weathered. We live in MA and one of the decks is in direct sunlight most of the day. The horizontal are free of obvious stains, but the railings have some remnants of red on them. I'm not sure if semi-solid or solid stain. My plan is to pressure wash and sand to get rid of it all. I have been told by some people that since it was a dark color to begin with, I need to stick with a dark color. I want to use a solid white stain on the railings and a red semi-solid or transparent on the horizontal. Will this work if I get rid of all previous stains?

Fred
Fred

I have an old redwood deck that has not been maintained. We are getting it professionally restained. The contractor is pushing for using a dark colored, acrylic solid stain (SW Woodscapes) on the verticals and light colored semi-transparent on the floor. The verticals are simple rough cut 1x1s – not round smooth spindles. I am leaning towards doing Defy Extreme semi-transparent on the floor and rails. The advantage of solid stain would be better coverage and longer initial wear. The disadvantage is peeling down the road and more difficulty redoing it once it has peeled. Which would be the least future maintenance of the verticals: restaining with semi-transparent every 2-3 years or having to scrape, sand and redo the solid stain every 5?

Dorrie
Dorrie

Color opinion needed! Almost ready to order my stain. I am looking at the AC Oxford brown for the flooring and really don't want to commit to white railing so am thinking about the semi trans cedar. I need to keep the flooring semi solid for UV coverage and there is some newer replaced wood with the much older. Need some idea on the color for the railings to go with Oxford brown. I am just too afraid to commit to the white railings and a little scared to commit to a total Oxford brown deck. It's traditional style and square with a bump out on one end. Opinions!

Terre
Terre

I am wanting to do the two tone project on my deck. What oil based product do you recommend for the white on the rails, or do I need to use an oil base? I am assuming the oil base will handle the summer/winter elements in NW Missouri better than a latex base product.