Deck Stain Reviews Ratings
Deck Stain Reviews Ratings
Deck Stain Reviews Ratings

Best Stain for New Cedar Deck

New Cedar Wood

New Cedar Wood

What Stains Work Well a New Cedar Deck

There are many different types of cedar used for exterior surfaces with Red Cedar being the most common. Unlike some types of wood that need to dry out, new cedar should be cleaned and stained as quickly as possible to avoid water damage and sun fading (Always follow the stain brand’s directions though).

Many wood stains have difficulty penetrating new dense woods like cedar. If a stain does not penetrate the wood it will remain on the surface and become susceptible to peeling and flaking. The best wood stains for new cedar are deep penetrating paraffinic oil based stains that are thinner in viscosity. Stains for new cedar wood should dive deep into the wood to condition the wood cells and provide protection from UV fading and moisture damage.

We like a couple of different stains for new cedar wood. One is Armstrong Clark Wood Stain. It is composed of both drying and non-drying oils that break apart from one another throughout the application process. The non-drying oils dive into the new cedar to condition the wood’s cellular structure while the separated drying oils cure on the exposed surface to not only lock in the conditioning oils, but to protect the surface from natural weather exposure.

Another similar stain best for new cedar wood is Timber Oil Brand. This is a paraffin oil based wood and deck stain that penetrates deep into new cedar wood and decks. This cedar stain conditions the wood cells while providing water and UV protection. The Timber Oil brand promises ease of application of good penetration into new decking.

Prepping new cedar wood is important to stain life and performance. New cedar wood should be cleaned using a sodium percarbonate wood cleaner to remove mill glaze and other contaminants that may have infiltrated the wood during construction.

Once the new cedar wood has been cleaned the wood will appear darker. While the wood is still wet, apply a wood brightener to restore the cedar wood’s original color. Brightening wood after it has been cleaned will also open the wood pores to allow the conditioning oils to penetrate better.
Proper cleaning and brightening will ensure the best stain for new cedar wood will perform as expected and provide lasting beauty.

Questions? Please Ask Below


Rate Our Article


Average Article Ratings Score

4.9/5 (20)

4.9/520


264 responses to “Best Stain for New Cedar Deck”

  1. Mn_Dan says:

    I am building a western cedar deck in the spring. Would it be a good idea to buy the wood now and season it in my garage (in Minnesota, so install in 5 or 6 months)? Would I need to prepare the wood before staining it if I go this route? Do you have a stain that you think works best in very cold climates?

  2. Tricia says:

    Thanks for all the info. I have a cedar pergola designed and built about a month ago. The cedar is rough sawn. Does it still need to be cleaned and brightened? I live in Mississippi – hot and humid in the summer. Should I stain now to prevent fading? If so, what do you recommend?

    Also , I have a wooden deck underneath built from pressure treated lumber. I think it would need to be cleaned and brightened before staining. Right? How long should I wait to stain it? Thanks!

  3. John says:

    I am building a new home, wanting to side the house with cedar board and batten. What is the proper way to prep the cedar and can you recommend a stain that will best put up with the elements as we have southern exposure so there will be a lot of sun/heat.

  4. Ken says:

    I am about to build a pergola with eastern cedar I cut from my property just 5 days ago. How much dry time do I need before using? The wood is very beautiful & red now and I DO NOT want to change the color. What is the best way to seal and protect to preserve the color and prevent graying? (Product type plus manufacturer)

    • You cannot prevent graying without changing the color. The tint is the UV blocker. Clear sealers with no tint will not provide UV protection. You should wait a month to dry before applying.

  5. Rich says:

    First this is a great web site. Very helpful. However, even though I am more informed, I am also a little confused. I read the one article that says it is very important to let the deck board age and weather before they are cleaned and stained and I understand the reasons why. But now in this article it says; “new cedar should be cleaned and stained as quickly as possible to avoid water damage and sun fading.” So exactly what does that mean? I am about to start to resurface my deck. I have a cedar deck I installed 25 years ago. I am replacing all of the deck boards with new cedar. I live in the Southern part of NJ. I was thinking that I should Install the new decking now and then clean, brighten and stain in the early fall. Is this the correct treatment? Also, would your suggest the Armstrong or TWP product for my area? I like the idea of the separate drying oils in the Armstrong product.
    Thank you.

    • Rich, yes it is confusing and sorry for this. It really comes down to which stain you want to use and their suggestions for Cedar wood. They are not the same. For example TWP wants 4-12 months of weathering no matter the wood type. AC wants 2-3 months. Defy says you can stain cedar right away, but says to wait 3+ months for PTP. Timber Oil or Ready Seal can be applied right away as well. If you want to use the AC, wait a few months, lightly clean and then apply one coat this year. Lightly clean in 12-18 months and apply a light coat again to the horizontals. After that you should be good for every 2+ years.

  6. Mary says:

    I just had a cedar deck installed 2 weeks ago. I love the color it is now. If I use Timber Oil brand if I use a clear coat will it keep it from greying? Also how often will I have to treat the deck?

  7. Allison says:

    What is the best stain to use on a cedar deck that has aged for over a year (is now very grey). Ideally we would like a nice redish cedar colour and long lasting through Canadian weather.

  8. mike says:

    Will you be testing Sansin dec?

  9. Katie Schwab says:

    I have a cedar deck that is maybe 10 years old but very sturdy and I used some bear deck over on the floor of the deck (bad decision ) it bubbled and peeled, I plan on sanding it down and going over it with a light tinted stain / sealer in hopes of keeping the gray at bay and I have a question , how soon can I stain after sanding and what stain do you suggest

  10. Eileen says:

    We installed a new cedar deck last summer. We cleaned the mill and then stained it using Sikkens. I believe the directions on the Sikkens was 1 coat only. The finish is rather uneven with darker spots and shine in some areas. We just cleaned it with an Olympic Cleaner and it looks better but still uneven. What should I do before staining again and should I switch products? I do not want to use a solid stain; I want the cedar to look as natural as possible

    • You need to remove the Sikkens. Try the Restore a Deck Stain stripper and a good pressure washing to remove as much as possible. Sand the rest if it does not all strip off. Brighten the wood when done and rinse well. Stain with a penetrating stain that is semi-transparent. TWP or Armstrong Clark.

  11. Dave says:

    Sorry took a bit to figure how to post pics from iPad
    Here’s what the old wood looked like before I started and it appx. 13-15 years old http://i922.photobucket.com/albums/ad65/olracer/

Leave a Reply


as of March 2016
  • 21,000+ Questions, Answers, and Consumer Reviews
  • 170+ Help Articles and Reviews
  • 3200+ Forum Help Posts
  • 1700+ Consumer Star Ratings


Find Products?

Manufacturers and Websites:
...See All Product Websites

Help/Reviews



*This is first and foremost a help site from our experience as wood restoration contractors. All stain and prepping manufacturer directions were followed with our reviews and ratings. We offer no guarantee of similar results. Take inconsideration that wood and deck stain results may differ due to prepping procedures, different wood types, exposure to UV radiation, natural weathering, etc.

Login